Comment Policy

“If you can’t play nice, we do not owe you an explanation.”

However, in the best interest of promoting civility, we will clarity our policy here.

Catholic Stand insists on a civil and respectful dialogue on our website and social media platforms. From politics to liturgy, our global Catholic audience is divided on many issues, but we aim to create space online where all perspectives are welcome. It is our hope that all visitors contribute their views and that no one person or group dominates the conversation.

In order to maintain an open but still welcoming forum for debate, we ask that visitors regulate themselves by these three simple rules.

Be charitable: Personal attacks on writers, public figures/the subject of a story, and fellow commenters will not be tolerated. This includes doubting somebody’s faith.

Remain on topic: Editors may determine when a conversation has strayed too far from the original post.

Be brief: Make your point concisely on our site. Don’t preach. Don’t lecture. Simply state your position.

Comments will not be removed simply because they express opinions in disagreement with the Catholic Stand or the Catholic Church. However, comments that will be deleted include those that contain:

– Vulgar language

– Personal attacks/inflammatory remarks against a person or group; including the author and the Pope

– Content/comments off topic

– Spam

– Links to sites that contain offensive material or attack a person

– Promotion of services, products, political organizations/agendas

– Information that is factually incorrect

We will not offer commentary to our reasons for deleting.

Comments left by others on this website do not necessarily reflect the views of the Catholic Stand or the Catholic Church.

1 thought on “Comment Policy”

  1. Hello,

    I just had a conversation with some Catholic women who matter of factily informed me that our liberal priest routinely gives Holy Communion to non-catholics.

    I replied that non-catholics do not believe that It is the body and blood of Jesus, and that the priest is doing wrong.

    Her retort was that Jesus would not deny anyone Holy Communion, and again, I reiterated the fact of the transubstantiation, and these people don’t believe it.

    Her answer was that they believe it is a holy thing to us, and continued to defend this priest, and insist that Jesus would not deny them.

    I am concerned about this, as well as the fact that the priest does not like putting the Eucharist on a person’s tongue, and insists It go in the hand.

    I just moved to this parish, and am now sorry about doing so.

    What do I do now?

    Thank you,

    Mary

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