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Church History

Florence Nightingale and The Sisters of Armed Conflict

May 16, AD2017 0 Comments
Florence Nightingale and The Sisters of Armed Conflict

In 1910 Florence Nightingale died. In her last will and testament, Nightingale bequeathed $1,500 [$40,000 in current values] to Sister of Mercy Mother Stanislaus of the Hospital of St. John and St. Elizabeth along with all her Catholic books in French and English.   She left the same amount of money to the Reverend Mother […]

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The Optimism of Pope John XXIII

May 15, AD2017 1 Comment
The Optimism of Pope John XXIII

Don’t trust your pessimistic feelings. There was a great outpouring of elation from the laity and the clergy in 1959 when Pope John XXIII announced his plans to convene the Second Vatican Council. He was 68 years old and was considered too old to take on such a gigantic task. His optimism frightened the Cardinals […]

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Differences in Doctrine Are Not Mere Window Dressings

April 28, AD2017 5 Comments
Differences in Doctrine Are Not Mere Window Dressings

With the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation coming up later this year, it’s sad to note that while great strides have been made in ecumenical outreach between the various Christian communities out there, there are still many things that divide us. However, there are more than a few Christians, typically those outside of mainline Protestant […]

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Mother Cabrini:The First American Saint

April 28, AD2017 1 Comment
Mother Cabrini:The First American Saint

“Although her constitution was very frail, her spirit was endowed with such singular strength that, knowing the will of God in her regard, she permitted nothing to impede her from accomplishing what seemed beyond the strength of a woman.” Pius XII The first American citizen to be canonized as a saint of the Roman Catholic […]

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Time, Progressivism, Death, and the Liturgical Calendar

March 3, AD2017 0 Comments
Time, Progressivism, Death, and the Liturgical Calendar

Time present and time past Are both perhaps present in time future, And time future contained in time past. If all time is eternally present All time is unredeemable. What might have been is an abstraction Remaining a perpetual possibility Only in a world of speculation. What might have been and what has been Point […]

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Church History: The Four Horsemen of Apologetics

March 1, AD2017 1 Comment
Church History: The Four Horsemen of Apologetics

Sharing the Catholic faith with our separated brothers and sisters can be a challenge, especially when there isn’t a shared understanding of early Church history. Many still believe that the Catholic Church was actually created when the Emperor Constantine signed the Edict of Milan, making the Christian faith legal in the Roman Empire. The other […]

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Athanasius Contra Mundum

January 28, AD2017 0 Comments
Athanasius Contra Mundum

Saint Athanasius, a Doctor of the Church, and the foremost defender of the divinity of Christ, is one of the key figures in the history of the Faith.  His era, the Fourth Century, was a time period of turbulent change, not unlike our own in that respect. With the conversion of the Emperor Constantine to Christ, the Church was […]

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Contemplating Martyrdom: A Test of My Faith

January 15, AD2017 2 Comments
Contemplating Martyrdom: A Test of My Faith

Imagine living in a time when Roman soldiers could walk into your house without notice and demand you show your loyalty by burning incense as a sign of worship to the Emperor. Anyone failing to do this would be given a death sentence. As a Christian in America I have fortunately not faced anything similar […]

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Multifaceted Approaches to World Peace

January 8, AD2017 4 Comments
Multifaceted Approaches to World Peace

During the eighties, I edited an anthology, Philosophical Perspectives on Peace, which included numerous prescriptions for world peace by philosophers, psychologists, and litterateurs from the ancient world, and through the Renaissance and Enlightenment, up to the late twentieth century.   The proposals of these authors seem to break up naturally into the following categories: 1) […]

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Catholic America under Archbishop Carroll

December 17, AD2016 3 Comments
Catholic America under Archbishop Carroll

What became troubling in America in the late 18th century, with its hard-won freedoms, was instead of maintaining consistent and constant with their Holy Faith, Catholic behavior, in wanting to become assimilated into the new country began to adopt a way of life that began to ignore and downplayed the very points of Catholic doctrine […]

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Survey Says Many Protestants Believe More Like Catholics

November 17, AD2016 28 Comments
Survey Says Many Protestants Believe More Like Catholics

Heresy is running rampant in America. At least that’s what the headline on a recent article at The Federalist said. The article, “Survey Finds Most American Christians Are Actually Heretics,” written by a young man named G. Shane Morris, states that a recent survey of 3,000 people found that “although Americans still overwhelmingly identify as […]

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The Forgotten History of Anti-Catholic Riots

November 13, AD2016 0 Comments
The Forgotten History of Anti-Catholic Riots

In the subtle shift away from the dominant agricultural communities to the rising dominance of cities and their segregation of incoming immigrants, cultures will bind themselves within their own. It was the rise of the tenements and the subsequent use of cheap labor for the lowest jobs which helped to foster what is termed as […]

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God’s Secret Plan

November 11, AD2016 4 Comments
God’s Secret Plan

I remember going to watch the musical Godspell over forty years ago. I think I was the only person present who did not like it. However, it did inspire another most unusual theatrical idea that I thought was quite wonderful.  The idea came from the Shakespearean actor,  Alec McGowan, and it hit the London stage […]

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Nuns of the Battlefield

November 10, AD2016 0 Comments
Nuns of the Battlefield

Visitors to Washington DC might be surprised at first to encounter a monument, across from Saint Mathew’s Cathedral, to nuns and sisters entitled Nuns of the Battlefield.  It was erected by the Ladies Auxiliary of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in 1924 to honor the some 600 Catholic nuns and sisters who during the Civil War nursed […]

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Amoris Laetitia, Mercy Robots & Sinning In Heaven

November 10, AD2016
Amoris Laetitia, Mercy Robots & Sinning In Heaven

Many scholars and theologians think that, at best, certain statements in the papal Exhortation Amoris Laetitia are ambiguous, with some possible interpretations being heresy. For this reason, forty-five theologians have appealed to the Vatican for what they see as errors in Amoris Lateitia to be corrected [henceforth herein “AL”]  so the Exhortation will not proclaim […]

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Are You Saved ?

November 1, AD2016 7 Comments
Are You Saved ?

Forty years ago, when I was still a Protestant, I looked at Catholics with suspicion. Catholicism seemed like a cult that worshiped Mary and idolized statues.  I pictured Catholics rattling off memorized prayers as clouds of eerie incense billowed around them, bells rang, and candles illuminated their pagan rituals.  Ironically, I now endure similar misconceptions […]

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Jesus Freak

October 30, AD2016 6 Comments
Jesus Freak

Recently, I posted pro-life comments on an article about a celebrity who said that he and his girlfriend were “eternally grateful” that Planned Parenthood was there for them to help them kill their first child. In my comments, I mentioned God had made this unique child in His image and that – despite the fact […]

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The Sacred in the Broken

October 13, AD2016 0 Comments
The Sacred in the Broken

“Sanctuary, (from the late Lat. sanctuarium, a sacred place), a sacred or consecrated place, particularly one affording refuge, protection or right of asylum; also applied to the privilege itself, the right of safe refuge” (Encyclopedia Britannica). This sacred custom and tradition, fully incorporated by the Catholic Church, found her greatest proponent from the beginning of […]

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Hero of the Maine: Father John Chidwick

October 3, AD2016 0 Comments
Hero of the Maine: Father John Chidwick

Night, February 15, 1898, the American battleship USS Maine lay at anchor in the harbor of Havana.  Although tensions were running high between the US government and Spain, the colonial power occupying Cuba, the night was calm.  Suddenly, at 9:40 PM,  a huge explosion devastated the forward section of the Maine, an external explosion setting off the […]

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Rejoice Always! Really?

September 27, AD2016 1 Comment
Rejoice Always! Really?

This seems to be impossible. St. Paul tells us: “Rejoice always, pray continually, in all things give thanks.” (1 Thess 5:16-18). No Joy In Pain & Suffering Who rejoices when her child is injured? Who rejoices when he loses his job? Who rejoices when she is lying in pain, dying? Who rejoices at a broken […]

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