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Author Archive: Anthony S. Layne

Born in Albuquerque, N. Mex., and raised in Omaha, Nebr., Anthony S. Layne served briefly in the U.S. Marine Corps, and attended the University of Nebraska at Omaha as a sociology major while holding a variety of jobs. Tony was a "C-and-E Catholic" until, while defending the Faith during the scandals of 2002, he discovered the beauty of Catholic orthodoxy. He currently lives in Denton, Texas, works in the home-mortgage industry in Dallas, participates in his parish's Knights of Columbus council, and bowls poorly on Sunday nights. Along with Catholic Stand, he also contributes to New Evangelization Monthly and occasionally writes for his own blogs, Outside the Asylum and The Impractical Catholic.

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Conciliar Reform in the 1960s: Politics Become Religion

September 15, AD2017 0 Comments
Conciliar Reform in the 1960s: Politics Become Religion

Why do many Roman Catholics put up so much resistance to reintroducing traditional liturgical elements to the Mass? In two recent articles, Catholic Stand writer Nicholas LaBanca interviewed two Eastern Catholic priests, Fr. Thomas Loya of the Byzantine Rite and Fr. Alexander Wroblicky of the Ukrainian-Greek Rite. Both men observed that Millennials take to elements […]

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Ask Tony: Did the Pope Declare Liturgical Reform “Irreversible”?

August 27, AD2017 18 Comments
Ask Tony: Did the Pope Declare Liturgical Reform “Irreversible”?

Is liturgical reform “irreversible”? And what does that mean in practical terms? Pope Francis’ August 24 address to the participants of the 68th Italian Liturgical Week included a phrase that has predictably stirred up concern and ire among his traditionalist and conservative critics. As is also predictable of controversies surrounding Francis, it’s “much ado about […]

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My Enemy is My Neighbor: Becoming a Good Samaritan

August 22, AD2017 1 Comment
My Enemy is My Neighbor: Becoming a Good Samaritan

“Who is my neighbor?” Today, I think, this question is more pertinent than ever. Social media is great at creating the illusion that we’re all in each other’s back pocket. But it comes at the cost of making friendship more of an abstraction, as we make “friends” of people who are little more than an […]

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Fear, Trust, and Skinny-Dipping in the Platte

July 27, AD2017 1 Comment
Fear, Trust, and Skinny-Dipping in the Platte

I have trust issues. It’s precisely this fact about me which limits my public self-revelation, and which more than anything else explains why I’m still a bachelor in my middle age. In the imprecise, even sloppy way we use the word love, to love someone isn’t necessarily to trust them with our vulnerabilities. We have […]

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Heaven, Evangelization, and Bumper Sticker Christianity

July 18, AD2017 2 Comments
Heaven, Evangelization, and Bumper Sticker Christianity

“Who did you bring with you?” That, Dear Reader, is the question God will supposedly ask us Christians when we beg admittance to the Heavenly Kingdom. I don’t suppose the person who thought this gem up really thinks of Heaven as a dinner party to which we all are expected to escort a plus-one or […]

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In the Tangle of Our Minds: “Thoughtful Theism” by Fr. Andrew Younan

June 8, AD2017 0 Comments
In the Tangle of Our Minds: “Thoughtful Theism” by Fr. Andrew Younan

There are any number of reasons to believe that a God exists. But actually proving that God exists is much harder. And once you prove that a God exists, you still have to connect said God to the God of Christianity. Philosophy is hard mental work; most of the bad ideas driving our culture today […]

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A Matter of a Universe That Matters: Why I Am a Christian

May 30, AD2017 2 Comments
A Matter of a Universe That Matters: Why I Am a Christian

“Always be ready,” Scripture tells us, “to make your defense to anyone who demands from you an accounting for the hope that is in you” (1 Peter 3:15). Here is my defense for my hope in Christ, and it comes down to this: either we exist for a larger purpose or we don’t. There are […]

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Can Christians Believe in a Christ Without Miracles?

May 19, AD2017 0 Comments
Can Christians Believe in a Christ Without Miracles?

Do we really need to believe in certain miracles to be Christians? That is the question Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times asked Evangelical pastor Rev. Tim Keller and more recently former President Jimmy Carter. The answer Kristof seems to want is, “No, you can be skeptical about the Virgin Birth and the Resurrection […]

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Thrashing Against the Zombie Hordes: Christianity and the Culture War

May 6, AD2017 0 Comments
Thrashing Against the Zombie Hordes: Christianity and the Culture War

In a previous Catholic Stand article, “When the Needle on the Spiritual Tank is On ‘E’”, I said I hoped to explain more fully my decision to retire the “culture warrior” writing persona. And in fact, I did give a little more explanation in a post on The Impractical Catholic which published the day before. […]

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What’s Wrong with the (Postmodern) World: Catholicism and Intelligence, by Fr. James V. Schall

April 25, AD2017 0 Comments
What’s Wrong with the (Postmodern) World: Catholicism and Intelligence, by Fr. James V. Schall

  Jesuit philosopher Fr. James V. Schall has been described as “America’s Chesterton,” according to the cover blurb from theologian Tracey Rowland. Like G. K. Chesterton, Fr. Schall has a talent for making philosophy accessible to the average person, the mark not only of the true sophisticate but also of the good teacher. But also […]

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When the Needle on the Spiritual Tank is On “E”

April 8, AD2017 2 Comments
When the Needle on the Spiritual Tank is On “E”

So I went to Confession last Saturday (March 25). I don’t go to Confession nearly often enough. I go so infrequently that I have an app to remind me how to say the Act of Contrition (Laudate). I won’t tell you when the penultimate time was, but I will say Obama was President. That was […]

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Remember that You are Dust

March 1, AD2017 1 Comment
Remember that You are Dust

“Remember that you are dust and to dust you shall return.” These are the traditional words with which the priest traces the ashes on the foreheads of the faithful on Ash Wednesday. But the Roman Missal gives the priest an option: he can say instead, “Repent and believe in the gospel.” There are also two […]

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Give Us This Day Our Supersubstantial Bread

February 11, AD2017 1 Comment
Give Us This Day Our Supersubstantial Bread

“Give us this day our daily bread” … what does that mean? On the surface, it’s a simple acknowledgment that the things we need to live all have their source in God, as well as a request that our needs for the day be provided. However, hiding under that simple word “daily” is many centuries’ […]

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Hume, His Guillotine, and the Being of Ought

January 20, AD2017 2 Comments
Hume, His Guillotine, and the Being of Ought

You probably had your first experience of reality long before you were born, in your mother’s womb. From that experience, a small handful of crucial ideations were created. It was your first experience of otherness, as well as your first experience of selfness because I came in contact with something that was not I. This is […]

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How the Religious Right Destroyed Itself

October 21, AD2016 33 Comments
How the Religious Right Destroyed Itself

The year 2016 will go into the history books as the year the Religious Right destroyed itself. Instead of trusting in the Lord, the Religious Right, fearful of the future and unwilling to accept an honorable defeat, bowed down in worship not so much to a golden calf as to a copper-toned ass. The Failure […]

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Political Control and the Freedom of Weakness

August 28, AD2016 3 Comments
Political Control and the Freedom of Weakness

  There’s a certain freedom in powerlessness, the loss of control. Recently, Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput wrote that the “astonishing flaws” of both major candidates was “depressing and liberating at the same time. Depressing, because it’s proof of how polarized the nation has become. Liberating, because for the honest voter, it’s much easier this year […]

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The Search for Justice and the Devil’s Dare: Correction

August 23, AD2016 1 Comment
The Search for Justice and the Devil’s Dare: Correction

On August 13, 2016, Catholic Stand published “The Search for Justice and the Devil’s Dare”, by Ramon Antonio A. Aldana. As Mr. Aldana’s managing editor, I was responsible for setting the essay up for publication. However, in doing so, I neglected to change the author’s field, which defaulted to “Anthony S. Layne”. As a consequence, […]

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Trust and the Objective Certitude of Faith

August 8, AD2016 2 Comments
Trust and the Objective Certitude of Faith

  The Mass readings for this last Sunday, August 7, have as their common theme trust in the Lord. Another word for this trust is faith. For us in the beginning of the twenty-first century, the idea of faith has something of an air of “buying a pig in a poke” to it, or of […]

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Men and the Rape Conversation

June 11, AD2016 4 Comments
Men and the Rape Conversation

  Recent events in the story of convicted rapist Brock Turner force the conversation about rape into a deeper understand of this complicated subject. It is a multifarious conversation, touching upon sex, consent, sexual differentiation, women’s equality, and college campus culture, among other things. But in many respects, it is the wrong conversation, full of […]

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Amoris Laetitia and the Progressive Pope Myth

April 23, AD2016 22 Comments
Amoris Laetitia and the Progressive Pope Myth

In a discussion of the God-as-watchmaker metaphor with Jonathan Witt, philosopher Jay Richards remarked, “It’s amazing how a simple image can hijack a discussion for a century and a half.” (Benjamin Wiker and Jonathan Witt, A Meaningful World: How the Arts and Sciences Reveal the Genius of Nature, p. 54) Almost as soon as he […]

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Casting Your Vote as a Faithful Catholic

February 12, AD2016 45 Comments
Casting Your Vote as a Faithful Catholic

Here we are, coming into the backstretch of the quadrennial presidential election cycle. Of course, from here on out, you’re going to have your eyes and sensibilities assaulted by talking heads telling you for whom you should vote — or, at least, traducing and belittling every candidate but the ones they prefer. Many of the […]

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How Should We Honor Our Elderly Parents?

January 16, AD2016 3 Comments
How Should We Honor Our Elderly Parents?

  In response to Dr. Denise Hunnell’s December 29, 2015 Catholic Stand post, “Family Life as ‘Domestic Pilgrimage’”, a loyal reader brought up a question in regards to the Fourth Commandment, “Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long in the land which the Lord your God gives you” (Exodus 20:12; […]

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The Politics of American Narcissism

November 26, AD2015 23 Comments
The Politics of American Narcissism

Egotist, n.: A person of low taste, more interested in himself than in me. —Ambrose Bierce, The Devil’s Dictionary In 2000, you probably could have asked twenty of your friends and coworkers and found only one person who knew something about narcissism. Fifteen years and a gazillion selfies later, narcissism and narcissist are tools of […]

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